Easy Everyday Vegetable Stir-Fry

Easy Stir Fry Ingredients ©2014 LaDomestique

We had a couple days of unbelievable sunshine and warmth here in Dublin this week (though today it has turned cloudy and cool). In true la belle vie style my husband made the last minute decision to take a vacation day and we skedaddled off to Portmarnock beach. It felt so good to put my feet in the warm sand, breathe the salty air and listen to the ocean waves. When the weather is warm and the days are spent outdoors having fun all I really want is to come home and throw together something quick and easy for supper.

Taking a break from meat and carbohydrates for one meal can leave you feeling a bit lighter and healthier. That being said, you’ll be surprised at how filling a bowl of stir-fried vegetables can be. My Easy Everyday Vegetable Stir-Fry is packed with ingredients that promote the health of your skin– which really needs that extra support during summer battling the sun’s rays. Carrots, broccoli and Bok Choi are all known for their skin-boosting vitamins and minerals. Both broccoli and carrots are high in the anti-oxidant beta-carotene, while carrots contain silicon for strengthening nails and skin. No need to peel organic carrots– just wash and scrub off the dirt. Also, don’t discard those broccoli leaves– they’ve got higher levels of beta-carotene than the florets and stalks. Toss the broccoli leaves into your stir-fry at the end with the Bok Choi leaves.

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Delicious Detox Beetroot, Avocado and Wild Rice Salad

Delicious Detox Beetroot Salad ©2014 La Domestique

I don’t believe I ever saw a single beetroot growing up. Never even thought much about that strange dirt cloaked root until I grew up and planted a garden. I fell in love with beets after tasting my very first homegrown beet baby, pulled from the soil just minutes before cooking.

I love beetroot because it’s not just flavourful—it’s highly aromatic. I’m not talking about the shrivelled specimens, petrified beet fossils left to languish in supermarket fridges. Freshly harvested beetroot from the garden or farmers market is perfumed with the sweet and musky scent of the soil.

The shockingly crimson colour of beetroot is due to a special type of anti-oxidants called betacyanins, which aid the liver in detoxifying the body while also reducing cholesterol and blood pressure. Beets are packed with iron and B vitamins as well, to keep your blood cells healthy and your nerves firing on all cylinders. I’m talkin’ all sorts of anti-inflammatory goodness to keep your heart pumping and your blood flowing.

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Celebrate the Season: Spring Pea, Spinach and Fennel Soup

Spring Pea, Spinach and Fennel Soup ©2014 La Domestique

June is the height of spring, when the garden really starts producing. You can see pink radish shoulders poking out of the soil, voluptuous bunches of salad greens and perfect pea pods dangling from delicate trellised vines. It’s an exciting time for a gardener, harvesting the first bounty of the year and bringing it straight to the table. The veg is still alive and full of nutritious goodness. You see, once vegetables are picked they begin to deteriorate, losing precious vitamins and minerals. By the time they reach the supermarket and languish on the counter for days these vegetables are only a shadow of their former selves. You may be trying to do the right thing and eat healthy fresh produce, but it’s just not the same as freshly harvested produce. The missing ingredient: life.

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Foolproof Fish: Salmon Cooked in a Parchment Paper Bag

Foolproof Salmon in Parchment ©2014 LaDomestique

 

Let’s talk about fish…

First of all, fish is SO good for you

 

Especially oily fish, like salmon, herring, mackerel, sardines, lake trout and tuna.

These fishes are rich in omega-3 fatty acids—essential for your brain, your mental/emotional function and reducing your risk of heart disease, cancer and other inflammatory disorders.

 

Secondly, fish is delicious

 

I love fish because it’s light and healthy but also a satisfying meal that gives me long-lasting energy.

How much oily fish should you be eating to reap the benefits?

The American Heart Association recommends people eat omega-3-rich oily fish AT LEAST two times a week. A serving is 3.5 ounces of cooked fish.

 

Finally, fish is easy!

 

Yes it is! I know cooking fish intimidates many of you, but I promise you can do it. Today I want to share my go-to method for teaching beginners to cook fish: salmon cooked in a parchment paper bag. You’ll love this because it’s impossible to mess up! I’ve even created a video on how to make the parchment paper bag.

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5 Facts Everyone Should Know About Coeliac Disease

Middlle Eastern Salad ©2014 LaDomestique

I have a confession to make: for a long time I didn’t take coeliac disease seriously. Back in 2007, when I worked in a fine dining French restaurant, gluten-free was just becoming a thing. To chefs and waiters it was an annoyance, right up there with being allergic to garlic (which is in EVERYTHING) or being vegan (no disrespect, vegans).

Today gluten-free is mainstream and I bet everyone knows someone who avoids the gluten grains (wheat, barley and rye). Though we’re all much more aware of gluten intolerance, many of us really don’t fully understand it. This week is Coeliac Awareness Week in Ireland, and May is Celiac Disease Awareness Month in the United States, and it’s time for you to get savvy about celiacs, whether you get the squirts from eating gluten or not.

The Coeliac Disease Awareness campaigns have really opened my eyes about gluten intolerance, and I’ve learned a few facts that are going to change the way you think about your gluten intolerant friends forever. If you suspect you may be intolerant to gluten, this could be the push you need to get serious about it today.

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